The Smoke Ring Myth

The “smoke ring” is formed by nitrates curing the outer layers of the meat, it is not an indication of how well smoked a piece of meat is.

In a BBQ or Smoker, nitrates in the smoke will combine with moisture and the rub on the surface of the meat, this will penetrate the meat to a depth of a centimetre or so (1/2 inch) where it cures the meat.

The curing sets the Myoglobin (red pigment) in the meat to create the distinctive red coloured ring. Uncured proteins lose their colour and turn grey when they cook.

The Smoke Ring can also be “Manufactured” by adding small amounts of Nitrate Cure to your BBQ Rub.

This will give you that classic Ring of cured meat around the outside of your meat, no matter if it was cooked on fire or not.

Some Briquette fuels have Nitrate added so they produce the Smoke Ring effect reliably

BBQ Competition Judges are told to ignore the Smoke Ring because it can be produced without smoke in a gas or electric oven

Previous Page

Join our Facebook group of Food Explorers

The information in this App is provided by Urban Griller in Western Australia

urban griller bbq school logo

© Urban Griller      All Rights Reserved

© Chef Tools     All Rights Reserved

App Help, Terms and Privacy Policy

NAVIGATE TO ANOTHER SECTION OF THE CLASS

EASILY MOVE BETWEEN BBQ LESSONS

Lesson One (Meats)
Lesson Two (Temperature)
Lesson Three (Cooking)

Urban Griller Chef Tools App

TEMPERATURE & UNIT CONVERTER

TIMERS

RECIPES

COOKING EDUCATION

TIPS, TRICKS and WILD IDEAS

AND MORE

Get the App